102 – TMG Hospitality Trailblazers: Mark Williams

by | October 12, 2022

The first installment of Hospitality Trailblazers on the Suite Spot podcast with Marketing Director/Host Ryan Embree, featuring President of Coakley & Williams and SVP of Business Development at Hotel Equities, Mark Williams!

These two discuss everything from the origin story of Coakley & Williams, navigating the new landscape of the hospitality industry, and what is on the horizon for travel and tourism. Listen now.

Episode Transcript

Our podcast is produced as an audio resource. Transcripts are generated using speech recognition software and human editing and may contain errors. Before republishing quotes, we ask that you reference the audio.

Ryan Embree:
Welcome to Suite Spot, where hoteliers check in and we check out what’s trending in hotel marketing. I’m your host, Ryan Embree. Hello everyone, and welcome to another episode of The Suite Spot. This is your host, as always, Ryan Embree. And today I teased it in our 100th episode. We are starting a brand new hospitality series called TMG Hospitality Trailblazers. And what this series is all about are those individuals and hotel groups that are really pushing forward our industry, getting some one-on-one insights and perspective on what they’re experiencing now and what they see in the future. And I think we have just the embodiment of a hospitality trailblazer today with me, Mark Williams, president of Coakley and Williams, and Senior Vice President of Business Development at Hotel Equities. Mark, this is your first time on the Suite Spot. Welcome in.

Mark Williams:
Yeah, great to be here. Thanks so much, Ryan.

Ryan Embree:
Yeah, absolutely. Now what we always like to do with new guests on this podcast, Mark, is ask ’em how they got started in the industry. I know for your personal background, you know, a lot of people just kind of find themselves in the industry, but you actually have hospitality through a couple generations. But tell us that journey that led you to Coakley and Williams and now Hotel Equities as well.

Mark Williams:
Yeah, sure. Absolutely. Well, I’ll go backwards a little bit and then we’ll go forwards from there. So our company, started in 1961. We are a third generation business, which is kind of amazing. I think there’s only about like 5%, I forget what the percentages are of businesses that actually make it to the third generation. So for me, that’s very humbling and it’s an honor to be a part of this, this company, and to work for, a group that’s been, you know, started by my grandfather and his partner. They actually were in the construction business. They met, on a rainy day through a mutual acquaintance. They shook hands. They never signed a formal partnership agreement to start the business. It was all really initially based off that handshake, which is really awesome. And that kind of, that spirit of integrity, I feel like has carried itself through our business over the years. They built their first hotel in 1971. It was, it was right off the beltway. They got into the hotel management business because they were doing what they were doing very well. There’s a lot of backstory and anytime you’re opening things and you’re in this business that we’re in, there’s always funny stories and challenges and there’s a lot of funny, interesting stories that happened as they got that off the ground. And so as time went along, you know, we, we got into the hotel management business, and then kind of in the mid nineties, my father bought the management company and there was a construction company as well. There’s still Coakley Williams Construction Company that was bought by one of the Coakley sons. And so, so things moved on and they progressed and growing up, I, I never thought that I would be in this business. I thought, yeah, I have, my dad had us working in the hotels, which was great. And I was, you know, doing odd jobs, doing things around the property and spend some time working behind the front desk, which was great. And, but I didn’t think that I’d be doing this. And so I thought that I’d be going down the theater route of all things. I was gonna be a theater major. That’s what I went to school for. And, and it’s interesting now, I talked to people that are in other business things and they actually take theater classes because there’s, there’s, some good lessons and, and things, a way to communicate and do things, because of theater. So anyway, as fate would have it, I was, I wasn’t even thinking about it. I was going to school in Western Maryland, and I saw a little ad for the Disney College program, and I said, Well, you know, I’ll sign up for this. And, and many people have done this. And what turned out to be six months turned into like five years of, of time in central Florida. And that’s kind of what got me into it. I ended up going to University of Central Florida and, the Rosen College of Hospitality and, you know, took the classes at, I met my wife there, while going to UCF. And once we got out of college, it naturally made sense to work for the family business that was in hospitality, which is what the degree I was getting. So that’s what we did after school. Both my wife and I started working for my father up in Maryland. We moved up to Maryland from Florida. And that initial time just trying to figure out where we were going, what we were gonna be doing, and figuring that all out as time progressed, got got to spend some time in training, and then also, and then from there, got to spend some time in business development. And I’ve really, really enjoyed, business development over the years because it allows you to really touch a lot of aspects about the company, from all different disciplines in all different departments. And, you get to communicate and interact with people and it’s, and the stories are all different and, and the, and the situations are all different. So that’s been great.

Ryan Embree:
What a unique perspective, you know, growing up in the industry, like I said, we talked to a lot of hoteliers on this podcast that, you know, kind of get their start similar to what you did, maybe just doing odd jobs as a bellman front desk agent. That’s where I actually found myself as, as well. But for you to have that kind of pedigree of hospitality within your family, I’m sure that’s a huge advantage for you and certainly presents a unique perspective for the industry moving forward. Now, I have to bring this up because I am also a fellow UCF Rosen College alum. I feel like we’re seeing more and more of it now of this unique hospitality first track, which is so great. But why do you think hospitality specific programs and educational tracks are so important for our industry, especially today?

Mark Williams:
Yeah, and, I’ll mention, I’m, I’m still a part of the, Dean’s Advisory Council with UCF and it’s a, it’s a great group of people to be a part of and associated with, awesome university, that is out there available, today for students. And I think it’s a really, really important, because the breadth of, and the spectrum of hospitality segments of, as far as what you, what individuals can find themselves in, it goes all the way from the theme park side of it. But now it goes all the way up to, you know, senior living and other different avenues. And the reality is, Ryan, is that we need to be cultivating the leaders of tomorrow. And today. We’ve got supervisory and managerial roles that, that need to be filled today. So for school programs such as Rosen and others around the country that are very well known, we need to be, you know, communicating to students and people in high school that this is a viable industry to get into because we need those leaders of tomorrow and today. And we also need to be communicating that to the parents as well. That’s very important that the parents are aware that for their children, this is a viable business to get involved with or many different businesses within hospitality.

Ryan Embree:
Yeah, absolutely, I mean, one of the first lessons I remember being taught over at Rosen is hospitality is the oldest job out there, right. Restaurants and hotels are one of the oldest, yet everything is so ever changing in our industry. So you’re right, we do need these leaders to be coming up through these educational tracks because hotel management, even today, comparatively to a decade or a couple decades ago, has completely changed a lot on the technology side. We’re gonna get into that a little bit about what those changes look like and what potentially changes are on the horizon. Yeah. But to move backwards a little bit, Mark, one of the lessons that there was no way that I remember at Rosen was what to do during a pandemic if you had a hotel or, or a hotel group, right? So Covid 19, the pandemic has changed obviously our everyday life in a lot of ways. But for our industry specifically, maybe what are some new normal trends that you’re seeing on your end, business development side or even operational at the property level that you’re like, this looks like it’s here to stay, it’s not going away?

Mark Williams:
I think a few things. It’s interesting. I think that there’s been a desire, and I’ve saw, I saw a little ad for it recently, or not little ad, but an article about this desire for less interaction for when guests and consumers are going to the property. And we saw this before the pandemic people looking to do check in on their phones and all that, to not have to deal with people. And so there’s some of that or more of that, maybe that was started pre pandemic and it’s just become more prolific and that kind of thing. But I do think that at the same time, pre pandemic, I remember seeing JD Power studies that showed that the more interaction that you had, or there’s certain amount of touch points that team members that a specific hotel had with a guest, that satisfaction would actually increase. And so while there’s a desire for less interaction, there’s still, I think, an a need for it, because I think that contributes to satisfaction. We’ve seen some recent JD power studies about satisfaction being down with management groups and airports. So it seems kind of, it seems kind of strange that there’s a desire for less, but there’s also a need for more. So anyway, I think also there, there, we, we keep hearing a lot about this as well. This, this growing trend of bi-leisure or blended travel. Just saw another article, recently, the, Chief Commercial Officer of American Airline said, said that business and leisure, well, nearly 50% of American revenues result from blended travel, which is up from about 25% from pre pandemic. So these are things that started pre pandemic, but I think have grown and developed post pandemic. So, and then the last couple things is people are looking for unique experiences. We’re doing some of that with, a glamping project that we have in, West Virginia right now. But people are looking for unique experiences. And we see that with more, with soft branded properties that just different things that people can do. And then finally, cleanliness is just something that’s gonna continue

Ryan Embree:
That’s here to stay. And, and those raised expectations, I don’t think they’re ever gonna come back down, Mark from, you know, this standard of cleanliness excellence, that a lot of hotels put a lot of capital and time in implementing cleanliness procedures just for peace of mind during the height of the pandemic. So you’re right, I can’t see a guest coming in and being like, oh, I don’t mind my, hotel or my room being, you know, as clean or dirty anymore. So you’re right. And, the adoption of mobile check-in has dramatically increased it. I think we’ll continue to see that. It’s almost like when the guests want that interaction, they want it and they want it now. And if you’re not there to answer the bell or answer the call, it’s certainly gonna impact your reputation. We’ve seen that on our side. That’s obviously our special, specialty is the reputation side of things. And then those unique experience that you’re speaking to as well. Glamping, yes. You know, Oh, we see it all over Instagram, TikTok, all these social media places. And I think that was out there already. But the, the pandemic really furthered that because people were exploring places that maybe they weren’t looking at prior to. Right? They wanted that kind of downtown experience, maybe urban setting. Now they’re going out to places that a little bit more unknown and it’s creating some really cool stories that are being shared online. And if you look for it, it’s also inspiring a lot of guests and travelers as well, if you’re promoting it the right way. Gonna switch gears a little bit to kind of more trending topics now. Obviously what we’ve seen inflation is the hot topic, right? People paying a lot more attention to their grocery bill to gas prices, right? You know, for the hospitality industry, we’re actually sitting back and in some markets really enjoying all time highs in ADR, which is fantastic, to hear, I wish we could, you know, go back and, and give a little comfort peace of mind, to us in 2020 about these ADRs and, and where that recovery was. But it makes the margins for error very, very slim for hoteliers when it comes to guest experience. Because if you’re charging top dollar, they’re going to expect top dollar service and everything in between. So what are some ways that hotels can maybe demonstrate some extra value right now? So the guests aren’t writing that narrative of this hotel’s way too expensive or not worth it.

Mark Williams:
This is something that hasn’t changed. I think pre pandemic or post pandemic, I think it’s always been the case. You know, whether you’re an Econo Lodge or, a Ritz Carlton and anywhere in between, we as hospitality professionals and leaders, we need to be training and reminding our people that to use what you have. And I think we forget that, you know, we think, Oh, well, because I’m, this, this is what it is. But, but you have to look at the tools and things that are available to you. If you’ve got a smile, use your smile. And I think it, it really goes back to getting the details, just the little details, right? And I think we’re starting to get back to people just saying whether it’s, Hey, I’ve got a list of restaurants in the area, I’ve got a pre-printed out, or I’ve got some options for you. Just what do you have at your disposal that you can use for the guests when they have a need that you can help with? So, and I think with that, the more that we take care of the details, you just have the basics done, right? The cleanliness, you know, hot shower, just being attentive and responsive and communicating just those basic things. I think the perceived value increases as those things are addressed and those things are taken care of.

Ryan Embree:
Yeah, definitely. You’re right. I think people are now looking back to pre pandemic before occupancy really started going up in the mid 2010s, and we are enjoying that high occupancy. I love that idea of just printing out a list of restaurants or unique places in your area. Doesn’t take a lot of effort, but it certainly shows extra value, which is what guests are looking for right now. They’re looking for that little bit more of experience because they’re paying a little bit more than they have in the past. So anything that you can do to make that guest special or a little bit more unique. I completely agree with you, Mark and I love some of those ideas that you shared.

Mark Williams:
One thing I’ll just say, I was in a mall this, this past week, and I haven’t been in a mall in a while, but, you know, everybody at the Kiosk, everybody at the kiosk, you know, those little freestanding kiosk we’re looking down at their phone and not engaging or anything like that. And I think, you know, just if we’re at the desk, we’re at a restaurant, how can we be engaged? I mean, just paying attention to people walking through saying, Hi, looking at what you can do again with what you have.

Ryan Embree:
Yeah. And sometimes it’s that, it’s those little things that make the difference because your competitors might not be doing it. And just keeping a close ear on that feedback. That’s what we’ve been consulting hotels with. We give tons of sentiment data. The blueprint for a really good guest experience at your property is right there. You just gotta know where to look in guest feedback, because they’re gonna tell you, they’re gonna show you it, but you have to have the tools to pull it out and do some analysis about it. So, and then actually, you know, do the operational changes that guests are asking for out there. Now coming back to the bi leisure blended travel that you were talking about, you spoke on this a little bit, but one of the things that our industry is really starved for since the pandemic is business travel. Question one. Where do you see business travel going in 2023? And question two is, are you telling your hotels to market to the business traveler in 2023 the same way as pre pandemic?

Mark Williams:
I would say that, you know, and as we’ve seen at recent conferences, lodging conferences happened recently, the word is subdued. So we’re, we’re always progressing. I think in everything we’re all moving forward into, into the future. All business segments are growing. But I agree that I think we’re gonna see that a little bit subdued into next year, but we’re gonna continue to grow that business segment. I would also say that, you know, I was just around a whole bunch of businesses that were a part of an event, and I just think, you know, in talking with them, it’s just people question, you know, with virtual meetings and such, can I hold back and just not do that trip and, I’ll just, you know, meet in person, but there’s gonna be the need. You just can’t get away from it from having those, those organic discussions that I think come out of inter-personal interactions from people on the other side of the table. So, but I do think that, while we do progress, there’s gonna be a lot of that held back because people just feel like they can take care of it, just doing the virtual meetings. So it’s gonna get, it’ll get back there though, as far as marketing to, to people differently, I think Absolutely. But I don’t think it’s just business travelers though. We need to always be looking at ways that we can market to all business segments differently than we we had before. I don’t think that that changes. So that always evolves, and that always changes ways that we can fish a little bit differently for the business as we go forward. So I don’t think that changes.

Ryan Embree:
Yeah, definitely. And I think the pent up demand, revenge travel, obviously there were a lot of people coming out of this pandemic leisurely that we’re saying, man, I just need a vacation. I just need to get out. Right? I don’t know if that hunger is there for maybe a business traveler to say, man, I just, I gotta get out there and go to that conference. But I will say, you know, we’ve, we’ve also attended some events. Once they’re out there, you kind of remember, you know, I know you were talked about lodging conference. It’s those places that people get together and you really realize how much you miss this. I definitely think people’s mindsets have changed for business travel, but there could be ways to also promote to those leisure travels to say, hey, extend a couple days work from the hotel. We’ve got excellent wifi. You can do all of your work remotely, which most people are doing anyways. So there’s definitely some unique opportunities, and we always have that question right at the front desk or maybe even when they’re booking, what are you staying for, for business or for leisure? I think it’s gonna be harder to determine, you know, someone say, hey, I’m just here for vacation, or I’m just here for work. That might blend a little bit than what we’re seeing in the past.

Mark Williams:
Yeah. I was telling some people I was sitting next to, I was asking them, what are you guys doing? And they said that they were extending their trip and I said, well, you’re a bleisure traveler. Like, oh, they didn’t know how to identify themselves as that, but they’re like, okay, okay, that makes sense.

Ryan Embree:
Yeah, definitely. We’ll see more and more of it. Now, Mark, one of the spaces that travel media works in is online reputation management for hotels. We’ve noticed when we’re responding to guest reviews, guest expectations, we talked about it before. Cleanliness, it’s at an all time high. How can hotels adapt to make sure that they’re meeting expectations? You spoke to this a little bit, especially with the historical staffing shortage that we’re going through right now.

Mark Williams:
I wanted to mention that I think that with all these expectations for pricing and all that, that’s a part of it. But I think right now, Ryan, that I think people will put a lot of pressure on themselves. When you think about the, the typical family going on right now and, and the typical person, I mean, there’s been a lot of stuff that people have experienced over the last two years and people work very hard and there’s been a lot of circumstances such as this hurricane and working from home and doing all these things. And I know for myself, like not only is there pent up demand to go do something, or if you haven’t done that yet, or expectations that the trip go well, but we just put a lot of pressure on ourselves to just get it right. By the time we get to where we’re going with the families, with significant others or whatever, we just want things to go right. Because I’m sure a lot of time has gone by since maybe the last trip or whatever, and we just, I think people want it to go well. And so I think for us behind the desks and behind the serving and all that stuff and taking care of that, we need to be mindful, I think, of what we ourselves have gone through personally and then also what others have gone through or potentially gone through. Personally, we do a lot of prayer calls and stuff within our organization, and I could tell you a lot of people are going through a lot of different stuff. We’re all dealing with things. And so years ago, Chick-fil-A put together this video talking about people’s stories, and I think it’s just important for us as we do guest service and we’re there for our guests remind ourselves about, we don’t know about all the stories that people and situations that the individuals are going through. It comes back to caring and compassion with those we work with and those that we’re serving.

Ryan Embree:
Yeah, I love that. And some of those things could be outside of our control from the hotel. I mean, we saw what happened with the airline industry this summer. You could have a family that’s come that’s been through day long is spending at the airport before they were even able to get to their destination. So you’re right, being an empathetic and listening ear, I definitely think can help absorb that. But I absolutely love everything that you’re talking about, and I think that goes a lot to the culture. And you know, some of the things that we highlighted last year, our series was called Hospitality Heroes at the time. Talking about all those stories of those individuals, we heard some, some incredible stories of, you know, GMs or corporate level people that were going back and cleaning rooms like the first time they had done it, and maybe a couple decades or even ever just people lending a helping hand to their community, which I think so prominently told the beginning of this, but it’s still some lingering effects here. And I think everything you’re saying is true. It all comes down to caring and comfort. Let’s kind of keep going on this momentum around culture, because obviously culture’s at the foundation of any successful company. Travel media group has a longstanding relationship with Coakley Williams and some properties at Hotel Equities. I had the pleasure of attending some of those in person events and got to experience that culture firsthand. So I’m wondering how hotel equities instills culture and Coakley Williams into their properties, into their team members.

Mark Williams:
Yeah, there’s a lot with that. I, you know, culture has a lot to do with people. The people that you hire, the people that you bring in. As people come and go, the culture shifts and changes a little bit. But for us as leaders within the organization, we always need to be mindful of keeping that vision, keeping that mission and values that we hold dear to our company, always in front of us. And also on the sides of us being guardrails for us as we make decisions, as we evaluate the future, as we evaluate circumstances that we’re approaching. So how do we do that? You do that by communicating it in your new hire orientation training. You highlight and you focus on it in your weekly monthly calls, quarterly calls, your conferences. You talk about it, you celebrate it, you celebrate the wins. And, and it’s always in focus. It’s always in view. Because the reality is, as leaders, we’re gonna have times of proving and times of testing that come up against our values and challenge them of whether or not we’re gonna execute ’em or whether or not we won’t do that. So I think keeping that in the forefront of all that we do is important in, in terms of what we communicate. We do a lot in terms of our learning and development departments. You got, incredible trainers and individuals that go out and we’re actively looking, as I said before, for individuals and people that can be a part of our manager and training programs and all the things that we do because we’re looking for the, the leaders of today and tomorrow. I look at a lot of companies, I look at a lot of different websites and a lot of companies have very similar things, Oh, we’re, we’re, you know, integrity and then this and that. All of that, it comes to light in those moments of truth, are we really living it out? We can say it, but it doesn’t matter until we’re actually actively and doing them that it, that things actually make sense and, and you can see it, see the culture happening.

Ryan Embree:
Well, certainly these past couple years have been a huge task for those groups like that you’re saying, you know, that has those standards, but being able to put those values and standards into practice, the ones that you can tell just really flourish, you know, and are driving and thriving. So let’s talk about the hotel equities portfolio a little bit. You know, you’re on the business development side, you guys have such a diverse portfolio, which is fantastic, right? So branded to independent small boutique, the large convention hotels, again, as you know, travel media group specialty is digital marketing and really helping hotels kind of tell their own story. But when you’ve got a group behind you that’s also has these culture and value that you’re trying to instill that you just spoke to, I’m wondering, with such a diverse portfolio, how do you ensure each property’s keeping its own identity while also staying true to that culture you spoke to?

Mark Williams:
I would say that most hotels do have their own identity because of the specific locations that they’re in. And again, specific people that are in those locations. And even though the brands that we, we manage a lot of Hampton Ends and Holiday Inn Expresses, and yet you’ve got a lot of that culture that’s unique, specific to that brand but you can’t get away from the fact that all these different pockets and places around the United States have got their own special unique cultures and special, unique, you know, people and things to do and see. And so it all comes back to training and leadership again, you’ve gotta start with getting the right people in the seats in the bus that makes sense and the right leader at the property to help communicate. Again, we’ve got some basis fundamental values, but what are the values of that leader wants to instill in those people that they’re serving and that they’re working with to train them to say, hey, you know, let’s really highlight what makes us special and unique here to this location.

Ryan Embree:
I think that’s important to hear Mark, because I think some groups and individual hotels make the mistake of maybe leaning too much on that identity from the brand or the group and just saying, I really don’t want to create a unique voice here, but you’re right, there is such uniqueness to whether it’s a different part of the country, whether you’re one brand versus another, it really is, when you’re talking about marketing and advertising, you know, people wanna see that personalized experience right now. They want to go, if they’re coming to some one part of the country, they wanna see that voice kind of shine through, whether it be through your reputation or your social media. So again, I think it’s important to hear that because that mistake sometimes made, I just lean a little bit too much and I’ll let either the brand or the group do most of the speaking for me, when you’ve got this identity out there and you’ve got this great story to tell, but how well are you telling it? Because that’s a skill there as well.

Mark Williams:
Well, I was just gonna say, I think we’ve just had, housekeeping appreciation week. We, we have these different events throughout the year and, and people send in all these pictures. We have a newsletter called the Huddle that you see all the pictures. They’re all different because people are creative. I mean, people take the liberty of doing things that are special and meaningful to the teams that are where they’re at. So I think that’s really neat that we have so much variety, that we have so much creativity that, people take that initiative to do special things.

Ryan Embree:
Absolutely. There’s certainly some incredible stories out there. I mean, we, we just have too many guests that come through our doors each day to not have those great stories, but it’s about telling them about finding the proper channels to tell them on. Social media has been huge for that. Reputation sites. I know sometimes hoteliers have a love-hate relationship with those, but when a good story is told out there, it really can define a booking decision and a booking journey for a guest. Now we labeled this series Hospitality Trailblazers because we’re talking about the future. We’re talking about what’s next, what’s beyond, I’m not gonna put you on the spot and ask secrets or anything like that, but what’s next for hotel equities in 2023 and beyond?

Mark Williams:
Well, this is a dynamic team and we’ve got, again, we’ve got tremendous people, associates that we get the opportunity to work with all across the country. And that’s kind of a unique thing about us in this past couple years is these strategic partnerships that we’ve had the privilege to be a part of and that hasn’t been taken lightly and the individuals that I have the opportunity to be around are just incredible folks in groups. And so I think we’re gonna see some more of that. I think, in the near future you’ll probably see hopefully more strategic partnerships and groups that we get aligned with, and there’s gonna be some of that. We just rolled out some news about our development services program that we’ve been offering, but we’ve really put more attention to that kind of service that we can provide, our clients. And then we rolled out some new highlighted focus due to our partnership with Greenwood Hospitality on our lifestyle and full service division that we’re doing. So we’re, we’re expanding in that area. There’s really no limits to what we can offer as a group and we really have all the tools necessary in the toolbox to be able to provide owners the opportunity to accomplish whatever they want to dream up and whatever they want to do. And so we’re gonna continue to look for unique groups that we can partner with, whether it’s co-working spaces that we already have a partnership with Thrive, which is really awesome, or we continue to expand proprietary concepts and things that we’re doing through our competitive social venue programs that we’re developing in Alpharetta. We’re gonna keep connecting with people that are great individuals and great groups and, and vendors and partnerships so we can get aligned with that’s what we’re gonna keep doing so that we can continue to offer our team members and our clients more and more.

Ryan Embree:
I love it. Mark, like I said first hand, I’ve had the opportunity to work with you and your group and you guys are just doing a fantastic job. So certainly a force to be reckoned with in the future. And we’ll keep an eye on yourself and Hotel Equities and Coakley Williams in 2023 and beyond. Well, thank you for sharing. Any final thoughts on today’s episode before we wrap up?

Mark Williams:
I would say, a wise person once said that the greatest leaders are the greatest servants. And so as we go through and we think about all that we face and all that we deal with, regardless of the things going on in the world, if we can focus on serving those around us and it starts right in our communities and it expands from there, that really can make a big difference in our world.

Ryan Embree:
Love it. Such an inspiring message and so excited to do this series because I think over the past couple years, you know, we’ve been doing these episodes just trying to kind of look towards the future, but we were just so uncertain at the time, but it really feels like things are, are starting to get a little less blurry now and the path is, is being trailblazed, right? Like we talked about. So, Mark, I want to thank you so much for joining me on the podcast. Thank you all for listening. We will talk to you next time on The Suite Spot. To join our loyalty program, be sure to subscribe and give us a five star reading on iTunes. Suite Spot is produced by Travel Media Group. Our editor is Brandon Bell with Cover Art by Bary Gordon. I’m your host Ryan Embree, and we hope you enjoyed your stay.

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103 – TMG Hospitality Trailblazers: Pete Sams

103 – TMG Hospitality Trailblazers: Pete Sams

Travel Media Group’s Hospitality Trailblazers podcast series is going full speed ahead!  Marketing Director and Host of the Suite Spot Ryan Embree sits down with a very special guest, Chief Operating Officer of Davidson Hospitality Group, Pete Sams! In this episode,...

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